Participants / Team

Jon deTombe
Jon, now a PhD candidate at Queen's University, worked on the project as both an undergraduate and master's student. His main focus was on interpreting and encoding William Corten's household records dealing with his acquisition and dispensing of curiosities for his collection. As part of this work he developed a method for handling Courten's personal cipher in XML markup. This work formed the basis of Jon's M.A. project "Digital Textuality, Autopoietic Editing, and the Courten MS." His continuation of this work is being published in Beyond Accessibility: Textual Studies in the Twenty-First Century.

James Hawkes
James, an honours student in Classical, Medieval, and Renaissance Studies at the University of Saskatchewan, was a research assistant funded by GRAND: Graphics, Animation, and New Media in 2014-2015. He worked on the Digital Cultural Heritage team researching the state of the art in web-curation of cultural heritage collections.

Robert Imes
Rob, a PhD candidate at the University of Saskatchewan, participated in the project from 2012-2013. His work on the Digital Ark included editing and XML markup of primary documents and research contributing to the project database and resulted in a conference presentation on "Hakluyt and Cope, Hakluyt and Thevet: Networks of Concerted Curiosity" at the Renaissance Society of American conference in 2014. In addition to his work on this project, he was also a member of the Textual Studies team in in INKE: Implementing New Knowledge Environments in 2011-2012.

Anne Kelly
Anne, now a doctoral candidate at Oxford University and Rhodes Scholar, was one of the first research assistants on the project and was responsible for preparing much of the primary material collected in the first year of the project.

Daniel Krahn
Dan, now a doctoral candidate at Queen's University, was one of the first research assistants on the project and was responsible for document transcription, XML markup, and digitization of early printed books.

Jade McDougall
Jade, a PhD candidate at the University of Saskatchewan, was a doctoral research fellow on GRAND in 2014-2015. Her research assignment was to design a model for an interactive interface for the Digital Ark that would enable multiple-levels of access to the collection to meet the diverse needs of potential users, from the curious tourist to the serious researcher. The results of this work was published in our 31 October 2015 blog entry.

Sarah Vela
Sarah, now an information architect at the University of Waterloo, was a research assistant funded by GRAND in 2014-2015. She worked part time on the John Bargrave materials, particularly on the coins, helping to prepare the alpha version of the Bargrave page here. She also worked with Dr. Tracene Harvey at the University of Saskatchewan's Museum of Antiquities designing a database for collections management and publication of the collection.

Meghan Wetzel
As an honours student in English as the University of Saskatchewan, Meghan worked for three years on the project and was responsible for transcription and XML markup of primary documents and data entry.

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